Volunteers help “clean” up The Chase Home

Recently, The Chase Home in Portsmouth welcomed more than a dozen volunteers from The Timberland Company as part of its Path of Service Program.

According to Craig Dennis, director of operations at The Chase Home, the crew spent an entire day landscaping and cleaning up the grounds.

“They did a wonderful job and are always a pleasure to have here,” he said. “The Timberland Company continues to be an avid supporter of The Chase Home each and every year.”

Timberland employees outside of The Chase Home while participating
in their Path of Service Program.

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home in Portsmouth serves at-risk youth annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs. Some youth are served in the community, while others live at The Chase Home.

Noting their contributions have historically ranged from landscaping, gardening and light construction to meal prepping, painting and general clean-up, Dennis said Timberland also provides support during the holidays for youth served by The Chase Home.

“They have donated much needed clothing and shoe donations, too,” he added. “We appreciate the relationship that’s been built over the years.”

Jason Blades, Community Engagement Manager at Timberland, said they also appreciate the relationship, which reflects a core value at the company.

“We believe that we can do good in our community and do well in our business, and that the two should go hand in hand,” he said.

As part of its Path of Service Program, Timberland offers up to 40 paid hours for full-time employees and 20 hours for part-time to provide service to the community.

“It is a voluntary employee benefit where they encourage employees to use this opportunity for service in ways that speak to their passions,” added Blades. “Timberland believes in the intersection of commerce and justice.”

To learn more about Timberland, visit timberland.com

Volunteers help “clean” up The Chase Home

“Ambassadors” making a difference at The Chase Home

Volunteers are the proverbial backbone of nonprofits, which underscores the importance of an innovative Ambassador Program at The Chase Home in Portsmouth.

“The Ambassador Program is a semi-structured way volunteers can get involved in our operation,” said Meme Wheeler, executive director. “They participate in planning fundraisers, conduct community outreach and get involved. They are an integral part of what we do.”

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home in Portsmouth serves at-risk youth annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs. Some youth are served in the community, while others live at The Chase Home.

For Ambassador Bill MacDonald, who works at Artisan Grounds in Portsmouth, participation in the program has been rewarding.

“I like being an ambassador, because I have a chance to be heard and make a difference in an organization that is working so hard to make a difference in kids’ lives,” he said. “It give me a chance to do things I like to do anyway.”

Wheeler said MacDonald’s involvement in The Chase Home has been instrumental.

Meme Wheeler (left) with Ambassador Bill MacDonald (right)

“Whatever we need, Bill seems to know someone or a business that can help,” she said. “He makes connections in the community for us all the time. I can’t thank him and all our ambassadors enough.”

As for current projects, MacDonald said he is working closely with the Board on a virtual fundraiser that launches in one month. 

“I am also working to promote Chase Home for Northeast Credit Union’s Love Your Community Award,” he said. “I’m encouraging folks to vote for Chase Home, which could win up to $5,000.”

Voting for Northeast Credit Union’s Love Your Community Award in October ends on October 31.

“With Bill’s help, I think we have a chance to win this award,” added Wheeler. “The great thing about this contest is that many nonprofits benefit, so the communities served by Northeast Credit Union are the real winners.”

To vote, visit thelyc.com.

“Ambassadors” making a difference at The Chase Home

New technology to transform how The Chase Home meets community needs

In October, The Chase Home will begin to use Apricot, case management software that will enable staff to utilize a centralized electronic record system to track participant progress and outcomes.

Developed by Social Solutions Global, Apricot is designed to help nonprofits measure and manage to outcomes while also offering a suite of tools for caseload management, reporting and analytics and participant engagement.

“The software will support Chase Home staff and leadership in making targeted interventions and data-informed decisions in the support of youth in its various programs,” said Jeffrey Haguewood, Owner, Sidekick Solutions.

Sidekick Solutions is an Apricot Certified Implementation Partner, specializing in technology for outcomes-focused nonprofits and public sector agencies.

“Our role is to guide Chase Home’s Apricot implementation as both a technical and consultative resource,” added Haguewood. “Our priority is to ensure that Chase Home gets the ‘right’ solution reflective of their processes and priorities for supporting youth in New Hampshire.”  

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home in Portsmouth serves at-risk youth statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs. Some youth are served in the community while others live at The Chase Home.

Meme Wheeler, executive director of The Chase Home, said the software will transform the way the agency uses data.

“We will be able to streamline and enhance the efficiency and quality of our case management and treatment planning for every youth we serve,” she said. “We will also be able to illustrate results-driven data to our donors that demonstrates impact.”

Meme Wheeler (l) with Chase Home Ambassador Bill MacDonald

As for how Apricot will enhance service delivery, Wheeler said it will save staff time, as they will no longer need to “go through piles of paperwork.”

“Apricot encompasses best practices and centralizes all of our data in one place,” she said.

She said the software also improves HIPPA compliance.

“It will help us tremendously with state licensing and certification regulations and the accreditation process, as we work to comply with the Family Services Act,” she added.

The project began, according to Haguewood, immediately before the start of the pandemic, which he acknowledged was challenging. It also, however, underscored the need for tools like Apricot to support remote work and capabilities for virtual client engagement. 

“The common pains associated with transitioning from current practices, some of which still reside on paper, have cropped up here and there, too,” he said. “I commend The Chase Home team, though, for its ability to refocus on the promise of Apricot, including deeper insights into youth progress and milestone achievements.”

According to Wheeler, the project is not only “ground-breaking” in scope, but in the level of customization of the software, made possible with Sidekick Solutions.

“The solution we have is not based on a template, but reflects our work-flow processes, compliance requirements, reporting goals and our ways of serving youth,” she said.

Haguewood added, “Software is often rigid, hard to use, or too generic to meet the evolving needs of a community-based nonprofit like Chase Home…Apricot is a platform Chase Home users are looking forward to using because it has been customized to model Chase Home’s unique characteristics, its vocabulary, and its evidence-based practices.”

The Chase Home

Expressing appreciation for various funders who have made the project possible, Wheeler said it is important Chase Home leverage technology now more than ever before.

“It is not enough to work hard,” she said. “We must work smart so we can do more for youth and families in our communities.”

To learn more, visit chasehome.org.

New technology to transform how The Chase Home meets community needs

Tenants Association at Pease (TAP) Selects The Chase Home as 2020 Beneficiary

Formed in 1999 to create an organized body of the people who work on the Pease Tradeport, Tenants Association at Pease (TAP) has selected The Chase Home as its 2020 charity beneficiary.

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From left to right: Craig Dennis, Chase Home Director of Operations; Deanna St. Hilaire, TAP President; and Meme Wheeler, Chase Home Executive Director.

“We choose a local charity that we feel could use the support and recognition and has not been chosen by us in previous years,” said President Deanna St. Hilaire, who said TAP has nearly 9,000 members.

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home serves more than 140 at-risk youth and families annually statewide through prevention, intervention, residential and community-based programs.

Meme Wheeler, executive director of The Chase Home, said she is “thrilled” at the selection.

“We want to express our deepest thanks for their support,” she said. “This is going to be a wonderful partnership.”

As beneficiary, The Chase Home will benefit from three TAP member events in 2020. These events include Spring Fling (May 7), Summer BBQ (August 13) and Fall Festival (October 28).

“We have great attendance at all of the events, especially the Summer BBQ,” explained St. Hilaire.

At each event, members will be asked to bring an item needed by The Chase Home or a cash donation.

“At each event, we will also provide a table or spot for Chase Home to collect donations,” added St. Hilaire. “We are excited to have Chase Home as our beneficiary in 2020 so we can help support their kids and raise awareness about what they do.”

To learn more about TAP, visit tenantsassociationatpease.org. To learn more about The Chase Home, visit chasehome.org.

Tenants Association at Pease (TAP) Selects The Chase Home as 2020 Beneficiary

The Chase Home Receives $1,000 from Sprague Energy

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Working with at-risk youth and their families in Portsmouth and throughout the state, The Chase Home recently received $1,000 from Sprague Energy to support its Seacoast Community Diversion Program (SCDP).

Serving nearly 50 youth, 11 to 17, and their families in the past fiscal year, SCDP works with youth and families struggling with complex issues, some of which include opioid addiction, homelessness and mental health issues.

“The program is unique because it is designed to divert youth from the path they are on before research shows it may be too late for them,” said Meme Wheeler, executive director of The Chase Home. “We are so grateful for the support of Sprague Energy in supporting SCDP.”

In the program, youth are required to sign a contract and meet regularly with a volunteer committee that reviews progress toward various clinical and therapeutic goals.

“These committees are composed of police chiefs, business persons, lawyers, school personnel and others from the community committed to making a difference,” added Wheeler. “The program is incredible because it involves police departments, probation officers, judges, city prosecutors and defenders, schools, mental heath agencies and so many others.”

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home serves more than 140 at-risk youth annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs. Some youth are served in the community while others live at The Chase Home.

The Chase Home Receives $1,000 from Sprague Energy