Volunteers help “clean” up The Chase Home

Recently, The Chase Home in Portsmouth welcomed more than a dozen volunteers from The Timberland Company as part of its Path of Service Program.

According to Craig Dennis, director of operations at The Chase Home, the crew spent an entire day landscaping and cleaning up the grounds.

“They did a wonderful job and are always a pleasure to have here,” he said. “The Timberland Company continues to be an avid supporter of The Chase Home each and every year.”

Timberland employees outside of The Chase Home while participating
in their Path of Service Program.

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home in Portsmouth serves at-risk youth annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs. Some youth are served in the community, while others live at The Chase Home.

Noting their contributions have historically ranged from landscaping, gardening and light construction to meal prepping, painting and general clean-up, Dennis said Timberland also provides support during the holidays for youth served by The Chase Home.

“They have donated much needed clothing and shoe donations, too,” he added. “We appreciate the relationship that’s been built over the years.”

Jason Blades, Community Engagement Manager at Timberland, said they also appreciate the relationship, which reflects a core value at the company.

“We believe that we can do good in our community and do well in our business, and that the two should go hand in hand,” he said.

As part of its Path of Service Program, Timberland offers up to 40 paid hours for full-time employees and 20 hours for part-time to provide service to the community.

“It is a voluntary employee benefit where they encourage employees to use this opportunity for service in ways that speak to their passions,” added Blades. “Timberland believes in the intersection of commerce and justice.”

To learn more about Timberland, visit timberland.com

Volunteers help “clean” up The Chase Home

“Ambassadors” making a difference at The Chase Home

Volunteers are the proverbial backbone of nonprofits, which underscores the importance of an innovative Ambassador Program at The Chase Home in Portsmouth.

“The Ambassador Program is a semi-structured way volunteers can get involved in our operation,” said Meme Wheeler, executive director. “They participate in planning fundraisers, conduct community outreach and get involved. They are an integral part of what we do.”

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home in Portsmouth serves at-risk youth annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs. Some youth are served in the community, while others live at The Chase Home.

For Ambassador Bill MacDonald, who works at Artisan Grounds in Portsmouth, participation in the program has been rewarding.

“I like being an ambassador, because I have a chance to be heard and make a difference in an organization that is working so hard to make a difference in kids’ lives,” he said. “It give me a chance to do things I like to do anyway.”

Wheeler said MacDonald’s involvement in The Chase Home has been instrumental.

Meme Wheeler (left) with Ambassador Bill MacDonald (right)

“Whatever we need, Bill seems to know someone or a business that can help,” she said. “He makes connections in the community for us all the time. I can’t thank him and all our ambassadors enough.”

As for current projects, MacDonald said he is working closely with the Board on a virtual fundraiser that launches in one month. 

“I am also working to promote Chase Home for Northeast Credit Union’s Love Your Community Award,” he said. “I’m encouraging folks to vote for Chase Home, which could win up to $5,000.”

Voting for Northeast Credit Union’s Love Your Community Award in October ends on October 31.

“With Bill’s help, I think we have a chance to win this award,” added Wheeler. “The great thing about this contest is that many nonprofits benefit, so the communities served by Northeast Credit Union are the real winners.”

To vote, visit thelyc.com.

“Ambassadors” making a difference at The Chase Home

The Groomsmith to celebrate 1-year anniversary, support The Chase Home

 

MacDonald, Maerder, and Shaffer-Rais_ The GroomsmithLocated at 28 Deer St. in Portsmouth, The Groomsmith will host a 1-year Anniversary Celebration on Saturday, October 5 from 10 am to 4 pm with proceeds from all haircuts to benefit The Chase Home.

The Groomsmith is owned by Reed Maerder, who along with brother and manager Zach will additionally provide cuts to male youth who live at The Chase Home. The event is hosted in partnership with J. Hilburn stylists, Graham Shaffer-Rais and Bill MacDonald.

“It’s been a great first year, and we want to pay it forward by supporting The Chase Home,” said Reed, who said their grand opening last year also benefited the nonprofit agency.

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home in Portsmouth serves nearly 300 at-risk youth and families annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs.

At the event, which will feature be a variety of raffle giveaways with proceeds to also support The Chase Home, complimentary food and refreshments will be available for guests.

Event proceeds will support The Chase Home’s Residential Program, which provides a home for youth who live there and receive24/7 support and clinical/therapeutic services. Examples of items provided toand foryouth in the program include everything from bedding and food to clothes.

“An event like this helps pay for these and critical everyday items,” said The Chase Home Executive Director Meme Wheeler. “We are so appreciative for Reed, Graham and Bill.”

The Groomsmith’s 1-year Anniversary Celebration will take place on Saturday, October 5 at 28 Deer St. in Portsmouth from 10 am to 4 pm.

To learn more about The Groomsmith, visit thegroomsmith.us.

To learn more about The Chase Home, or its upcoming 6th Wine & Chocolate Tasting, visit chasehome.org.

 

The Groomsmith to celebrate 1-year anniversary, support The Chase Home

The Chase Home’s Summer Program in Jeopardy

14066469_1742555312652597_7402010286160885767_oEvery summer, The Chase Home provides youth that live there with experiential learning opportunities that enhance the work performed by clinical staff. An unexpected funding shortage, however, jeopardizes the program.

“We expect to receive a little less than half of what we expected from a very consistent funding source to offset the cost of the summer program,” explained Meme Wheeler, executive director of The Chase Home. “The shortfall is about $7,000.”

Activities that take place during the summer includes camping, gardening, fishing, day trip to parks and recreation areas, education seminars and more.

“Our summer program empower our kids and helps build their confidence,” she added. “It is part of the therapeutic and clinical guidance provided by our staff year-round.”

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home serves nearly 300 at-risk youth and families annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs.

“We serve kids who have been abused, neglected, or who are starting to get in serious trouble,” said Wheeler, who hopes the community can rally around The Chase Home to “help our kids.”

“Our summer program is so important to them,” she said. “This program makes summer a special time for kids who really need one.”

The Chase Home’s Summer Program in Jeopardy