The Chase Home’s Summer Program in Jeopardy

14066469_1742555312652597_7402010286160885767_oEvery summer, The Chase Home provides youth that live there with experiential learning opportunities that enhance the work performed by clinical staff. An unexpected funding shortage, however, jeopardizes the program.

“We expect to receive a little less than half of what we expected from a very consistent funding source to offset the cost of the summer program,” explained Meme Wheeler, executive director of The Chase Home. “The shortfall is about $7,000.”

Activities that take place during the summer includes camping, gardening, fishing, day trip to parks and recreation areas, education seminars and more.

“Our summer program empower our kids and helps build their confidence,” she added. “It is part of the therapeutic and clinical guidance provided by our staff year-round.”

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home serves nearly 300 at-risk youth and families annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs.

“We serve kids who have been abused, neglected, or who are starting to get in serious trouble,” said Wheeler, who hopes the community can rally around The Chase Home to “help our kids.”

“Our summer program is so important to them,” she said. “This program makes summer a special time for kids who really need one.”

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The Chase Home’s Summer Program in Jeopardy

The Chase Home Receives $1,000 from Sprague Energy

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Working with at-risk youth and their families in Portsmouth and throughout the state, The Chase Home recently received $1,000 from Sprague Energy to support its Seacoast Community Diversion Program (SCDP).

Serving nearly 50 youth, 11 to 17, and their families in the past fiscal year, SCDP works with youth and families struggling with complex issues, some of which include opioid addiction, homelessness and mental health issues.

“The program is unique because it is designed to divert youth from the path they are on before research shows it may be too late for them,” said Meme Wheeler, executive director of The Chase Home. “We are so grateful for the support of Sprague Energy in supporting SCDP.”

In the program, youth are required to sign a contract and meet regularly with a volunteer committee that reviews progress toward various clinical and therapeutic goals.

“These committees are composed of police chiefs, business persons, lawyers, school personnel and others from the community committed to making a difference,” added Wheeler. “The program is incredible because it involves police departments, probation officers, judges, city prosecutors and defenders, schools, mental heath agencies and so many others.”

Founded in 1877, The Chase Home serves more than 140 at-risk youth annually statewide through prevention, early intervention, residential and community-based programs. Some youth are served in the community while others live at The Chase Home.

The Chase Home Receives $1,000 from Sprague Energy